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Conservation Areas

Sheffield has 38 conservation areas.  These vary in size, character and form but they are all recognised as areas that have special architectural and historic interest. They contain historically important buildings, features and architecture which link us to our past.  Most of our conservation areas have been designated by us but several are located within the Peak Park and are the responsibility of their local authority.

Use our interactive map to find out whether a property is situated within a conservation area.  You can see a list of all our conservation areas at the bottom of the page. Each page should give you details of what makes the area special and you can download the boundary map.

Policy Background

The Civic Amenities Act of 1967 gave us a duty to designate “areas of special architectural or historic interest, the character or appearance of which it is desirable to preserve or enhance”.

The policies that relate to all conservation areas are set out in the Sheffield Unitary Development Plan (UDP), which is the statutory development plan for Sheffield, adopted in March 1998. The UDP will eventually be replaced by the Sheffield Local Plan (formerly the Sheffield Development Framework or SDF), which will become the City’s portfolio of local development documents.

 

Effects of Conservation Area Designation

Changes to your property through repair, replacement or alteration need to be in keeping with the character of the building but also to the area itself.  The character of the area often comes from the materials and architecture that make it up.  We would encourage any development to respect these elements.  The way that buildings are laid out in the area may also have a direct impact on character.

Some conservation areas have extra controls placed upon them restricting you from doing certain work to your property without first seeking permission.

It is always a good idea to seek pre-application advice from a planning officer before starting any development.  Unauthorised work which damages the character of the conservation area may be an offence. 

 

Controls in the Conservation Area

Demolition

Demolition of buildings including walls may require planning permission. There is a presumption against demolition; however you should seek advice from a planning officer before you plan to do anything.

Solar Panels

In most cases putting Solar Panels on houses in a conservation area may be classed as 'permitted development' as long as it meets the relevant criteria.  If you are in any doubt please contact the planning department directly to discuss your proposals.

If the house lies within Nether Edge or Broomhill Conservation Area's it may have an 'Article 4 Direction' upon it.  Planning permission will therefore be required to install Panels on the roof slope fronting a highway.

Flats, shops and offices do not have permitted development rights so are all subject to planning permission.

Trees

Trees within a conservation area are protected from being cut down and if you wish to do work to a tree in the conservation area you must inform us at least 6 weeks in advance before this work takes place.

 

Conservation Area Appraisals and Management Proposals

We have a duty to periodically review our conservation areas and to publish proposals for their future preservation and enhancement.  To enable us to do this we produce two documents for each area.  These documents are called Conservation Area Appraisals and Conservation Area Management Proposals.

A Conservation Area Appraisal defines what contributes to the special character of an area and what is important to preserve or enhance.  It may also highlight any issues that may require further action.

The Conservation Area Management Proposals take the findings of the appraisal and present recommendations that will help to preserve and enhance the area in the future.

 

List of conservation areas

 

  • Modified: Apr 8, 2014 10:47:41 AM