Park Hill occupies a prime position just outside the city centre and provides a striking backdrop to city centre regeneration projects.

Park Hill is Grade II* listed and remains Europe's largest listed structure. The building alone covers an area of 17 acres and currently contains around 1,000 flats. In total the whole site covers 32 acres.

The slope of the site inspired the idea of a continuous roof line which results in the height of the blocks varying dramatically from 4 storeys at the top of the estate, rising to 13 storeys towards the city centre. It is a key gateway to Sheffield.

Media & awards

Documentary on the Regeneration of Park Hill

We commissioned a documentary about the regeneration of Park Hill, which covers its history, the listing and why each of the partners is involved and why they think it will be a success.

Buying & renting at Park Hill

Buying

If you are interested in buying a property at Park Hill please register your interest with Urban Splash.

Renting

All properties for affordable rent will be advertised through the Sheffield Property Shop and will be let by Great Places Housing Association. There may be some properties for market rent. Register your interest with Urban Splash.

Park Hill's history

Park Hill was the first completed post-war slum clearance scheme of an entire community in Britain. It was the most ambitious inner-city development of its time. In 1954 work began on the design of Park Hill and it was later built between 1957 and 1961.

Within the old Park area architects recognised there was a strong sense of local community and, in the design of Park Hill, tried to preserve this community spirit. Where possible, neighbours were rehoused alongside each other in the new complex and each flat opens out onto a 10 foot wide deck. This provided access for milk floats and communal areas, enhancing the image of "streets in the sky".

Over the years the estate has been home to 31 shops, 4 pubs, 74 garages, a primary and a nursery school, doctor's surgery and pharmacy. The shops were set at the lowest point of the estate, to which people were thought to naturally gravitate. 4 pubs and a launderette were more widely dispersed at points on the ground near lifts.

In 1998 Park Hill was listed as Grade II* by the then Department of Culture, Media and Sport.

This placed it amongst the top 5% of listed buildings in the country and identified it as a building of outstanding interest, drawing particular attention to the layout and appearance of the estate.

Vision

In 2003, in conjunction with English Partnerships (the national regeneration agency: Homes and Communities Agency), we began to put together a vision for the future of Park Hill, to achieve:

  • a vibrant, mixed tenure estate with owner occupation, rented and affordable for sale properties along with high quality retail and commercial premises
  • a mixed tenure, mixed use transformation of Park Hill as a fashionable city centre address

Partners

In 2004, an advert was placed to select a Registered Social Landlord and Developer partner. Great Places Housing Group and Urban Splash were selected.

Funding

The public sector will contribute the following:

English Heritage is providing £0.5m for specialist concrete repairs.

South Street open space

In 2005, we asked local residents about their ideas for the development of a new city park called Sheaf Valley Park. The vision was to form a series of linked, quality, open spaces and pathways from Park Square roundabout through to Norfolk Park.

The main part of the park is South Street Open Space (the bank directly behind the train station), in front of Park Hill flats. 

The proposals gained strong public support and the independent group ‘Friends of Sheaf Valley Park’ was formed.

The first stage of work began in September 2010 in South Street Open Space. It includes:

  • creating a direct stepped path from South Street to the Railway Station tram stop. While this is being created, earth will be moved to form a level space for events, with a series of seating terraces above where people can enjoy views of Sheffield City Centre and beyond
  • creating a new landscaped path which will be wheelchair accessible and well lit. This will be from the Railway Station Tram Stop to Shrewsbury Road. This will be funded from a combination of sources including Housing Market Renewal, MP4 (Making Places Profitable, Public and Private Open Spaces) and Section 106

These 2 projects will begin to make the South Street area of the park more useable as a public space and encourage people to walk through it.