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Care and support costs: what you pay for

People over the age of 18 who have eligible care and support needs may have to contribute towards the cost of their care and support.

We carry out a financial assessment to check how much you can afford to contribute towards your care and support.

The amount you have to pay will depend on your financial situation and is called a financially assessed contribution.

We do not ask you to pay any more money than your financial assessment shows you can afford.

 

Care and support you may have to pay towards

You may have to pay towards care and support that you receive while living at home, for example

  • home care (day and night)

  • day activities, respite care

  • supported living

  • support provided by a Personal Assistant (PA)

This is called non-residential care. The Fairer Contributions Policy explains this in more detail:

 If you receive support in a registered care home, this is charged using charging for residential care rules.

 

Care and support you won't have to pay towards

We will not ask you to pay towards the following care and support:

  • assessment and care and support planning
  • intermediate care, for up to 6 weeks (eg if you need care on discharge from hospital)
  • community equipment, for example bath seats or kettle tippers
  • minor adaptations, for example grab rails, costing less than £1000
  • care and support provided to people with Creutzfeldt-Jacob Disease
  • after care received under Section 117 of the Mental Health Act 1983
  • any service which we or the NHS have a duty to provide. This includes Continuing Health Care and the NHS contribution to Registered Nursing Care.

 

How much you will pay

The general rule is that you either pay the total cost of your care and support or you contribute what your financial assessment shows you can afford and we pay the rest.

If you have capital assets of more than £23,250, you will pay the full cost of your care and support.

Capital assets include savings, stocks and shares and other investments, but not the value of your home.

This is different if you live in residential care.

If you own a second home we will take the value of this into account.

If your capital assets are worth between £14,250 and £23,250, we will ask you to make a contribution towards your care and support of £1 per week for every £250 (or part of £250) of capital you have, above £14,250.

If your capital assets are worth less than £14,250, you will not need to contribute towards the cost of your support from your capital.
 

Minimum Income Guarantee

If your income is above the Minimum Income Guarantee, you may need to make a contribution to the cost of your support.

If your income is at or below the Minimum Income Guarantee, you may not need to make a contribution.

The Minimum Income Guarantee allows people who receive council arranged care and support at home to keep a certain level of income to cover their living costs. The Minimum Income Guarantee is an amount equal to the basic value of Income Support or Pension Credit plus an extra 25%.

 

Assessing how much you will pay

After we have assessed your care and support needs, if you are eligible to receive support from us our Financial Assessment and Advice Team will visit you to work out how much you will have to contribute towards the cost of your care and support.

This is called a financial assessment.

We will ask you to provide information about your

  • benefits, pensions or other income

  • bank and building society accounts, national savings, shares and other investments

  • fuel bills, Council Tax, rent or mortgage payments

  • Disability Related Expenditure. Disability Related Expenditure is additional money people need to spend due to their disability or ill-health. You can only claim this if you get a disability related benefit such as the care part of Disability Living Allowance (or Personal Independence Payment, PIP) or Attendance Allowance. You will normally need to provide proof of these expenses before a claim can be considered.

We will also do a check to make sure you are receiving all the benefits you are entitled to. If we think you are entitled to other benefits we will put you in touch with the appropriate organisation, or tell you how you can contact them directly.

 

Working out your contribution

First we work out your total income. We take account of

  • any benefits you receive, except those we ignore (listed below)

  • your State Pension and work pensions

  • any other income

  • your capital assets if they are between £14,250 and £23,250.

If you have savings or investments that are held jointly with your husband, wife or partner, we will only take account of half of the total amount.

If your husband, wife or partner has capital in their name, we can legally assume half of this capital is yours and you may be assessed as though it is your capital.

We then work out your contribution by taking your total income including any capital (less any income we ignore), and taking away

  • your Minimum Income Guarantee (an amount equal to the basic value of Income Support or Pension Credit plus an extra 25%) to cover any day to day expenses such as food and TV licence

  • your household costs (mortgage, rent and Council Tax payments)

  • your Disability Related Expenditure.

  • The amount left is called your ‘assessed income.’ It is the most you can afford to contribute towards the cost of your care and support.

If the cost of your care and support is lower than your assessed income you will pay the full cost of your care and support.

If the cost of your care and support is higher than your assessed income you will pay the amount of your assessed income, as this is the most you can afford.

 

Paying your contribution

Once we’ve worked out the amount you need to pay, we’ll send you a letter that explains how we worked out your contribution, how much you’ll have to pay, how you can pay and the date your payments will start.

If you receive a Direct Payment, we’ll pay an amount into your Direct Payment account every 4 weeks, less any contribution that you make towards your support.

You’ll have to pay your contribution into your Direct Payment account each month or weekly if you prefer.

If we arrange your support you can pay

  • by direct debit

  • at the post office or Pay Point

  • by cheque

  • by debit or credit card

You’ll receive monthly invoices for the amount you pay covering a 4 or 5 week period.

You must make sure you pay invoices in full within 14 days by whichever payment method you choose.

If you do not pay your invoice within 14 days we will send you a reminder. If you do not pay the invoice within the next 28 days we will send you a final notice.

If you still don’t pay your contribution we may take further action against you to collect your payments.

 

Questioning the amount you need to pay

If you don't agree with the amount you need to pay, you can appeal.

Contact us to ask us to look at your financial assessment, saying why you think the amount is incorrect.

If you are still unhappy with the decision, you can ask the Revisit and Review Panel to review your case.

The Financial Assessment Team will advise you on how to contact them.

This panel is made up of managers from both financial, social work and legal areas.

Make a complaint if you are not satisfied with the decision of the Revisit and Review Panel.

 

Difficulty paying your contribution

If you are having difficulty paying your contribution, contact us and a member of our Financial Assessment and Advice Team will help you.

 

Contact us

Contact us.

 

Download our factsheet

Download this information in our factsheet.

  • Modified: Apr 6, 2016 11:31:03 AM